Historic St. Mary's City Wins Archaeology Award

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Historic St. Mary's City Wins Archaeology Award

Baltimore, MD - 1/23/2012

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HSMC director of research Henry Miller accepts the SHA Award of Merit from Dr. William Lees, SHA President.  Also pictured is Maryland Underwater Archaeologist and conference co-chair Susan Langley.
HSMC director of research Henry Miller accepts the SHA Award of Merit from Dr. William Lees, SHA President. Also pictured is Maryland Underwater Archaeologist and conference co-chair Susan Langley.

Historic St. Mary’s City (HSMC) accepted an Award of Merit from The Society for Historical Archaeology during the SHA’s 45th Annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology held January 4-8 in Baltimore.

The Award was established in 1988 to recognize the specific achievements of individuals and organizations that have furthered the cause of historical archaeology.HSMC was recognized for over four decades of effort to preserve, protect, and interpret Maryland’s “ancient and chief seat of government” as an archaeological treasure for the public.SHA president William B. Lees wrote, “The field of historical archaeology has greatly benefited from the HSMC’s strong research focus and for the enduring role that HSMC has played in training students in historical archaeology”.HSMC was recognized as a leader in bringing archaeology to the public, starting in 1972 with the St. Johns dig.This was the first public archaeology in Maryland, with tours of the site, history explained, and select artifacts shown.

The Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) is the largest scholarly group concerned with the archaeology of the modern world.The Society promotes scholarly research and the dissemination of knowledge concerning historical archaeology.

Historic St. Mary’s City has conducted research on the site of Maryland’s first capital since 1969.Archaeologists have recorded over three hundred archaeological sites in the 30% of the National Landmark investigated thus far.The National Park Service has recognized St. Mary's City as "probably the most intact 17th-century English town surviving in our nation…represented entirely by archaeological resources."St. Mary's City offers a rare opportunity for researchers to coax information about the Maryland colony and people's lives from a priceless archaeological record.Since 1971, Historic St. Mary's City and St. Mary's College of Maryland have hosted a rigorous ten-week, summer Field School in Historical Archaeology. The program has attracted students from all over the United States and other countries, with many graduates now holding prominent positions in the field.The 2012 session runs May 30 - August 5.

For more information, contact the museum at info@stmaryscity.org or 240-895-4990.



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